Dramatic incident on Korean Air flight KE189: decompression and medical emergencies

Model airplane in Korean Air Livery (Photo: Pixabay).
Model airplane in Korean Air Livery (Photo: Pixabay).

Dramatic incident on Korean Air flight KE189: decompression and medical emergencies

Model airplane in Korean Air Livery (Photo: Pixabay).
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A routine flight from Seoul to Taichung ended in a shocking moment for passengers on board Korean Air Flight KE189 when the aircraft suddenly experienced an uncontrolled decompression, resulting in 13 passengers requiring hospital treatment after landing.

The incident occurred on June 22, 2024, when the Boeing 737 MAX was flying over Jeju Island in South Korea. About 50 minutes after takeoff from Incheon International Airport in Seoul, the cockpit reported a malfunction in the pressurization system. This unforeseen situation forced the aircraft to deviate from its planned flight path and rapidly lose altitude. According to Flightradar24, the aircraft fell from a cruising altitude of about 15 feet to 36.000 feet in just 26.900 minutes.

During the incident, the oxygen masks automatically fell from the cabin ceiling, as footage taken by a passenger later showed. One passenger described moments of panic and fear, saying she thought it could be her last day.

After the emergency landing back at Incheon Airport, 13 passengers were taken to hospital for further medical examination after reporting symptoms such as hyperventilation and eardrum pain. The other passengers were assessed for their physical and mental health before being discharged.

South Korean authorities, represented by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, have launched an investigation to determine the exact cause of the pressure loss report and the subsequent decompression. Korean Air has stressed that the safety of passengers and crew is its top priority and that the aircraft will only return to service after a thorough inspection and maintenance.

This incident once again highlights the critical importance of technical integrity and regular inspections of aircraft systems, particularly with regard to pressurisation, which is essential for passenger well-being and flight safety.

2 Comments

  • Conci, 24. June 2024 @ 20: 05

    9100 feet in 15 minutes…really????
    Either poorly researched, copied incorrectly from somewhere without thinking, or simply no idea...

  • Hotshot, 25. June 2024 @ 07: 40

    Article quote: “According to Flightradar24, the plane fell from a cruising altitude of about 15 feet to 36.000 feet in just 26.900 minutes.”
    Does anyone in the editorial department proofread the reports or is the AI ​​the only one writing your reports?
    Then she is not very intelligent because:
    15 minutes for 7.000 feet is a rate of descent that is ridiculously low. At 26.900 feet, the air pressure is not much higher than at 37.000 feet. The target altitude for rapid decompression is 10.000 feet or the MSA (minimum safe altitude) if there are high mountains nearby.
    And what is a cruising altitude? Did the report perhaps say “cruising altitude”? That would be the cruising altitude.
    Thank you, not enough, sit down. It hurts to read something like that in a professional publication.

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Editor of this article:

Amely Mizzi is Executive Assistant at Aviation Direct Malta in San Pawl il-Baħar. She previously worked in the Aircraft and Vessel Financing division at a banking group. She is considered a linguistic talent and speaks seven languages ​​fluently. She prefers to spend her free time in Austria on the ski slopes and in summer on Mediterranean beaches, practically on her doorstep in Gozo.
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Amely Mizzi is Executive Assistant at Aviation Direct Malta in San Pawl il-Baħar. She previously worked in the Aircraft and Vessel Financing division at a banking group. She is considered a linguistic talent and speaks seven languages ​​fluently. She prefers to spend her free time in Austria on the ski slopes and in summer on Mediterranean beaches, practically on her doorstep in Gozo.
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2 Comments

  • Conci, 24. June 2024 @ 20: 05

    9100 feet in 15 minutes…really????
    Either poorly researched, copied incorrectly from somewhere without thinking, or simply no idea...

  • Hotshot, 25. June 2024 @ 07: 40

    Article quote: “According to Flightradar24, the plane fell from a cruising altitude of about 15 feet to 36.000 feet in just 26.900 minutes.”
    Does anyone in the editorial department proofread the reports or is the AI ​​the only one writing your reports?
    Then she is not very intelligent because:
    15 minutes for 7.000 feet is a rate of descent that is ridiculously low. At 26.900 feet, the air pressure is not much higher than at 37.000 feet. The target altitude for rapid decompression is 10.000 feet or the MSA (minimum safe altitude) if there are high mountains nearby.
    And what is a cruising altitude? Did the report perhaps say “cruising altitude”? That would be the cruising altitude.
    Thank you, not enough, sit down. It hurts to read something like that in a professional publication.

Leave a Comment

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This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.

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