Switzerland tightens rules for historic aircraft

Flag of Switzerland (Photo: Unsplash/Ronnie Schmutz).
Flag of Switzerland (Photo: Unsplash/Ronnie Schmutz).

Switzerland tightens rules for historic aircraft

Flag of Switzerland (Photo: Unsplash/Ronnie Schmutz).
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In the aftermath of the Ju-52 crash, which occurred in 2018, the Federal Council is tightening the regulations for historic aircraft. Based on an analysis by the Federal Office for Civil Aviation, the Aviation Ordinance was amended accordingly.

Based on this, the Federal Council has amended the Aviation Ordinance: In future, commercial flights with people and goods with aircraft in the special category "historic" will no longer be permitted. Non-commercial flights are still possible for club members subject to a waiting period of 30 days. In addition, there is a new transport restriction. A maximum of nine people may fly in a corresponding aircraft, of which a maximum of six passengers. This limits passenger flights to a level that is customary in general, non-commercial light aviation.

For the protection of the flight passengers, the pilot must inform the passengers about the special approval of the aircraft in question. This ensures that passengers can decide before a flight whether they want to take the associated risks or not.

The new requirements for flights with historic aircraft are comparable to those of other European countries. They come into effect on October 1, 2022.

Comment

  • strand , 21. August 2022 @ 02: 07

    Was Switzerland previously a paradise for aviation scrap? The details for the repair of the Ju-52 at Ju-Air defy description. Main spar patched with pop rivets. Every TÜV would say no. Amateur handicraft. And the path of the ram drive: pitting. Rotten engines. The carelessness has continued in flight operations. One wonders why there are excellently restored classic cars in the USA.

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Editor of this article:

René Steuer is an editor at Aviation.Direct and specializes in tourism and regional aviation. Before that, he worked for AviationNetOnline (formerly Austrian Aviation Net), among others.

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About the editor

René Steuer is an editor at Aviation.Direct and specializes in tourism and regional aviation. Before that, he worked for AviationNetOnline (formerly Austrian Aviation Net), among others.

Nobody likes paywalls
- not even Aviation.Direct!

Information should be free for everyone, but good journalism costs a lot of money.

If you enjoyed this article, you can check Aviation.Direct voluntary for a cup of coffee Coffee trail (for them it's free to use).

In doing so, you support the journalistic work of our independent specialist portal for aviation, travel and tourism with a focus on the DA-CH region voluntarily without a paywall requirement.

If you did not like the article, we look forward to your constructive criticism and / or your suggestions for improvement, either directly to the editor or to the team at with this link or alternatively via the comments.

Your
Aviation.Direct team
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Comment

  • strand , 21. August 2022 @ 02: 07

    Was Switzerland previously a paradise for aviation scrap? The details for the repair of the Ju-52 at Ju-Air defy description. Main spar patched with pop rivets. Every TÜV would say no. Amateur handicraft. And the path of the ram drive: pitting. Rotten engines. The carelessness has continued in flight operations. One wonders why there are excellently restored classic cars in the USA.

Leave a Comment

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This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.

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