Wizzair accepts cash on board again

Sit in an A321neo from Wizzair (Photo: Jan Gruber).
Sit in an A321neo from Wizzair (Photo: Jan Gruber).

Wizzair accepts cash on board again

Sit in an A321neo from Wizzair (Photo: Jan Gruber).
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In the wake of the corona pandemic, some airlines introduced only cashless payments on board. This was the case at Wizzair and Ryanair, among others. Now the Hungarian lowcoster accepts cash on board again. However, if you pay with Mastercard or Visa, you now get a price reduction of ten percent.

The competitor Ryanair, on the other hand, does not want to see any cash, but can still only pay with credit and debit cards (with the exception of Maestro and Vpay). The “Cards-Only” policy leads to problems on many flights; normal debit cards (Maestro or Vpay) cannot be used to pay on board. The spread of offline-capable credit and debit cards of the Mastercard and Visa schemes is quite manageable, especially in Eastern Europe. In addition, there is the fact that certain issuers, such as fintechs, are blocked from acceptance by the airlines. Apparently, Wizzair might have missed some sales by not accepting cash, so that they are now back on cash. Incidentally, the sale on board takes place in the name and for the account of the Gategroup, whereby the airlines also earn money, of course.

Eurowings never waived the acceptance of cash. The passengers were always advised that card payments were preferred due to the pandemic, but cash was and is always accepted as long as it is in euros. Long before the corona pandemic, Easyjet preferred cashless payment on board and has been pointing this out for several years using on-board announcements.

Whether or not cash plays a major role in the spread of the coronavirus is extremely controversial. There are studies that state that the risk of infection should be extremely low or nonexistent and others expressly recommend cashless payment. In Austria it is absolutely unusual for a debit or credit card to be handed over to the cashier, but in other countries, such as Germany, the card is often “grabbed” and the cashier wants to put it into the terminal himself. The “contactless” advantage is then also lost. With regard to aviation, attention should be drawn to the fact that almost without exception all flight attendants wear disposable gloves during on-board service, which are then disposed of. This at least minimizes a possible risk to staff, although there are many different views on gloves, but that is definitely a different topic ...

Comment

  • Scrap metal aviators, 28. October 2020 @ 15: 41

    The credit card business is a sham anyway, if you look at the bills, you quickly figure it out the only winner is the credit card company, so you always pay for it, even if you pay for a trip with it, you then use the card during the trip insured for a certain period of time, but if you buy such an insurance in a travel agency or at the motorist club or when booking online and debiting it via the current account or paying in cash it is cheaper.
    But for many people, convenience takes precedence over thrift.
    That's why I prefer cash over these cards.

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Editor of this article:

Jan Gruber is Senior Editor at Aviation.Direct. Before that, he had held the same position at AviationNetOnline (formerly Austrian Aviation Net) since 2012. He specializes in low-cost carriers, regional aviation in the DA-CH region and in-depth research.

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About the editor

Jan Gruber is Senior Editor at Aviation.Direct. Before that, he had held the same position at AviationNetOnline (formerly Austrian Aviation Net) since 2012. He specializes in low-cost carriers, regional aviation in the DA-CH region and in-depth research.

Nobody likes paywalls
- not even Aviation.Direct!

Information should be free for everyone, but good journalism costs a lot of money.

If you enjoyed this article, you can check Aviation.Direct voluntary for a cup of coffee Coffee trail (for them it's free to use).

In doing so, you support the journalistic work of our independent specialist portal for aviation, travel and tourism with a focus on the DA-CH region voluntarily without a paywall requirement.

If you did not like the article, we look forward to your constructive criticism and / or your suggestions for improvement, either directly to the editor or to the team at with this link or alternatively via the comments.

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Comment

  • Scrap metal aviators, 28. October 2020 @ 15: 41

    The credit card business is a sham anyway, if you look at the bills, you quickly figure it out the only winner is the credit card company, so you always pay for it, even if you pay for a trip with it, you then use the card during the trip insured for a certain period of time, but if you buy such an insurance in a travel agency or at the motorist club or when booking online and debiting it via the current account or paying in cash it is cheaper.
    But for many people, convenience takes precedence over thrift.
    That's why I prefer cash over these cards.

Leave a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked with * marked

This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.

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