Corendon emergency landing in Basel more dramatic for passengers than previously known

Inflight view (Photo: Steffen Lorenz).
Inflight view (Photo: Steffen Lorenz).

Corendon emergency landing in Basel more dramatic for passengers than previously known

Inflight view (Photo: Steffen Lorenz).
Advertising

On board the Corendon Europe flight XR2271, which made an emergency landing in Basel on Sunday, much more dramatic scenes are said to have taken place than was previously known. Those affected report that the oxygen masks are said to have stopped working after a very short time. It is said that some travelers even had blood running out of their ears, so that they had to be taken to the surrounding hospitals immediately after landing.

A passenger told the local newspaper "In Franken" that he had noticed the smell of burning. Because his oxygen mask didn't work, he put on an FFP2 mask instead. He and his wife were worried about smoke inhalation. Otherwise it would have been quiet on board, because the travelers would have been in a kind of shock.

Next should because of that extremely fast descent blood ran out of the ears of some passengers. Medical tests have shown that their eardrums have burst. The travelers received emergency treatment in hospitals in France and Switzerland. The doors would have been opened immediately after landing. There was a very loud bang.

The accusation of "non-functioning oxygen masks" is not commented on

The airline Corendon Europe describes the case as very rare, but not uncommon. The crew would be schooled and trained for such incidents. From Corendon-Europe's point of view, it happened like this: "After reaching the flight altitude, the cockpit crew noticed that the pressure in the cabin was slowly decreasing. In the first step, however, they did not find anything, whereupon it was decided, strictly according to regulations, to head for the next airport in descent. The crew also decided to drop the oxygen masks.”

Regarding the allegation that passengers claim that said oxygen masks did not work, at least in part, the Malta subsidiary of the Turkish travel group is silent. It is only pointed out that these are regularly maintained. "Of course, there are always subjective feelings among passengers as to whether the oxygen is coming or not, some don't even know that they have to pull jerkily, although this is explained in the safety briefing before each flight," says a media officer.

The affected Boeing 737-800 is subject to a technical inspection. "The machine was put through its paces, but as of today no exact cause was found, the plane will then go back into service as usual. It's not that uncommon, it does happen, albeit rarely, most crews know it. It's happened twice at Corendon since 2005," according to the company, which says 15 passengers required hospital treatment after landing.

3 Comments

  • Michael , 17. June 2022 @ 20: 48

    Descending from 33.000 feet to 10.000 feet (4750 fpm) in just five minutes, taking a sharp turn and falling but barely effective oxygen masks, followed by an equally abrupt recovery from the steep descent, resulting in a number of passengers being hospitalized come. I think a "strictly by regulation" descent on the occasion of what the airline says is neither a rare nor a dramatic problem looks different. Or better yet, I hope so, as I'll be out and about with Corendon myself in a few days.

  • Michael , 17. June 2022 @ 21: 01

    A year earlier there was a dramatic incident on board the 9H-TJE that started in a very similar way ("exhaust gas smell" vs. "smoke development", unconsciousness as a result of the climb - a pressure problem?)https://www.austrianwings. info/2021/11/several-passengers-collapsed-in-737-by-corendon-pilots-continued-flight-for-hours/

  • frank benz , 19. June 2022 @ 22: 31

    The burning/burning smell described by the passenger may also be a result of the activated oxygen cartridges above the seats. It is not uncommon for the chemical reaction to produce the oxygen within the cartridges to produce a burning/fiery smell - especially as the cartridges become very hot.
    The descent seems to be a bit “exaggerated” in my eyes. I don't know the situation in detail, nor any flight data, but the number of "injured" could have been decimated with a somewhat more moderate sink rate. The only thing left to do is to wait for the BFU/SAIB report.

Leave a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked with * marked

This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.

Editor of this article:

Jan Gruber is Senior Editor at Aviation.Direct. Before that, he had held the same position at AviationNetOnline (formerly Austrian Aviation Net) since 2012. He specializes in low-cost carriers, regional aviation in the DA-CH region and in-depth research.

Nobody likes paywalls
- not even Aviation.Direct!

Information should be free for everyone, but good journalism costs a lot of money.

If you enjoyed this article, you can check Aviation.Direct voluntary for a cup of coffee Coffee trail (for them it's free to use).

In doing so, you support the journalistic work of our independent specialist portal for aviation, travel and tourism with a focus on the DA-CH region voluntarily without a paywall requirement.

If you did not like the article, we look forward to your constructive criticism and / or your suggestions for improvement, either directly to the editor or to the team at with this link or alternatively via the comments.

Your
Aviation.Direct team
paywalls
nobody likes!

About the editor

Jan Gruber is Senior Editor at Aviation.Direct. Before that, he had held the same position at AviationNetOnline (formerly Austrian Aviation Net) since 2012. He specializes in low-cost carriers, regional aviation in the DA-CH region and in-depth research.

Nobody likes paywalls
- not even Aviation.Direct!

Information should be free for everyone, but good journalism costs a lot of money.

If you enjoyed this article, you can check Aviation.Direct voluntary for a cup of coffee Coffee trail (for them it's free to use).

In doing so, you support the journalistic work of our independent specialist portal for aviation, travel and tourism with a focus on the DA-CH region voluntarily without a paywall requirement.

If you did not like the article, we look forward to your constructive criticism and / or your suggestions for improvement, either directly to the editor or to the team at with this link or alternatively via the comments.

Your
Aviation.Direct team
paywalls
nobody likes!

3 Comments

  • Michael , 17. June 2022 @ 20: 48

    Descending from 33.000 feet to 10.000 feet (4750 fpm) in just five minutes, taking a sharp turn and falling but barely effective oxygen masks, followed by an equally abrupt recovery from the steep descent, resulting in a number of passengers being hospitalized come. I think a "strictly by regulation" descent on the occasion of what the airline says is neither a rare nor a dramatic problem looks different. Or better yet, I hope so, as I'll be out and about with Corendon myself in a few days.

  • Michael , 17. June 2022 @ 21: 01

    A year earlier there was a dramatic incident on board the 9H-TJE that started in a very similar way ("exhaust gas smell" vs. "smoke development", unconsciousness as a result of the climb - a pressure problem?)https://www.austrianwings. info/2021/11/several-passengers-collapsed-in-737-by-corendon-pilots-continued-flight-for-hours/

  • frank benz , 19. June 2022 @ 22: 31

    The burning/burning smell described by the passenger may also be a result of the activated oxygen cartridges above the seats. It is not uncommon for the chemical reaction to produce the oxygen within the cartridges to produce a burning/fiery smell - especially as the cartridges become very hot.
    The descent seems to be a bit “exaggerated” in my eyes. I don't know the situation in detail, nor any flight data, but the number of "injured" could have been decimated with a somewhat more moderate sink rate. The only thing left to do is to wait for the BFU/SAIB report.

Leave a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked with * marked

This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.

Advertising